Big battle ahead as California considers restricting farm pesticide Trump’s EPA supports

July 21st, 2017 Business

A widely used farm pesticide that the Trump administration refused to ban could get restricted in California.

UK firms won’t be exempt from new EU data sharing rules – here’s why

July 21st, 2017 Business

U.K. businesses will still be forced to comply with rules that punish inappropriate sharing of consumer data, regardless of whether they leave the European Union or not.

Trump lifted the cap on H-2B worker visas. Then his businesses asked for 76 of them.

July 21st, 2017 Business

Trump's golf clubs and resorts on the East Coast have long relied on hiring foreign seasonal workers, Vox reports.

Retail, be warned, there’s not enough room in this hot women’s category to go around

July 21st, 2017 Business

Retailers big and small continue to look to tap into a market that has often been dubbed "hotter" than the rest: athleisure.

Big battle ahead as California considers banning farm pesticide Trump’s EPA supports

July 21st, 2017 Business

A widely used farm pesticide that the Trump administration refused to ban could get restricted in California.

Honeywell’s profit rises 5.5%

July 21st, 2017 Business

Honeywell reported a 5.5 percent rise in second-quarter profit, helped by strength in its aerospace, and performance materials and technologies businesses.

Hundreds of thousands could be arrested in huge Malaysian crackdown

July 21st, 2017 Business

Malaysian activists and business owners are alarmed over the arrests of over 3,300 illegal workers in a crackdown.

Blackstone, CVC make $3.7 billion bid for payments firm Paysafe

July 21st, 2017 Business

A consortium of Blackstone and CVC Capital Partners has made a 2.86 billion pound ($3.71 billion) bid for payments processing company Paysafe Group.

Sweden asked the public to vote on a name for a new train and this is what they came up with

July 21st, 2017 Business

A train operator in Sweden has vowed to name one of its trains Trainy McTrainface in a bid to bring “joy” to all those disappointed when the U.K. overturned a public vote to name a polar research ship with a similar quirky name.

Philips Lighting earnings ahead on better LED, home lighting margins

July 21st, 2017 Business

Philips Lighting, the world's largest maker of lights, on Friday reported a better-than-expected rise in second-quarter core earnings, as margin improvements at its LED and home lighting businesses offset falling sales.

Corning ‘immediately’ creating 1,000 new jobs in US, CEO says

July 21st, 2017 Business

The initiative is a collaboration with Merck and Pfizer and was announced at a "Made in America" event Thursday.

Op-Ed: Trump’s new NAFTA plan is all wrong. Here’s what he needs to do to fix it

July 20th, 2017 Business

Trump administration's objectives for renegotiating NAFTA are more of the same failed policies we've seen for years.

Euro surges against dollar as Draghi says QE tightening talks will start in September

July 20th, 2017 Business

The euro saw a sharp surge as Mario Draghi spoke on Thursday afternoon, with the president of the European Central Bank (ECB) discussing inflation expectations and the potential end of its asset-purchase program.

The red tape that could slow down Musk’s tunnel plans

July 20th, 2017 Business

Despite Musk tweeting he was optimistic about his tunnel going up quickly, red tape has a way of slowing things down.

A Bank of America vice chairman has been contacted about Uber’s vacant CEO position, according to a report

July 20th, 2017 Business

Anne Finucane, BofA vice chairman, has been contacted by multiple people regarding Uber's CEO position, a report says.

Target is ending its Cartwheel Perks rewards program, promising something better

July 20th, 2017 Business

Target sent an email to Perks users, saying: "As we close this chapter, we're getting ready to start a new one."

Regulating credit unions in Africa

July 20th, 2017 Business

Striking a co-operative note

THE most recent time Moses Kibet Biegon needed a quick loan was when his roof blew away. He got one from the Imarisha Savings and Credit Co-operative, in Kericho in western Kenya. Imarisha channels the savings of its 57,000 members into loans for school fees, business projects or, in Mr Biegon’s case, roof repairs. It runs a fund to help with medical bills. And it pays dividends to its members from its investments, which include a shopping plaza that it opened last year.

Savings and credit co-operatives (SACCOs) like Imarisha are the African version of credit unions: member-owned co-ops, usually organised around a community or workplace. Some are rural self-help groups with a few dozen members and a safe. Others have branch networks and mobile apps. The largest SACCOs rival banks; Mwalimu National, which serves Kenyan teachers, has even bought one.

The co-operative model brings “a more humane face” to finance,…Continue reading

How Donald Trump is monetising his presidency

July 20th, 2017 Business

Golf conflict

“PRETTY close to a laughing stock.” That is Walter Shaub’s verdict on America’s standing in the world, at least from an ethics point of view, under President Donald Trump. Mr Shaub’s view counts: he stepped down this week as head of the Office of Government Ethics, a federal watchdog.

He is leaving his job six months early, frustrated at the president’s failure to separate himself from his businesses, at White House foot-dragging on disclosing ethics waivers for staff, at its failure to admonish a Trump adviser who plugged the family’s products in an interview, and more. “It’s hard for the United States to pursue international anticorruption and ethics initiatives when we’re not even keeping our own side of the street clean,” Mr Shaub told the New York Times.

No American leader has ever entered office with such wide business interests as Mr Trump. In the context of the country’s corporate…Continue reading

The spread of 3D models creates intellectual-property problems

July 20th, 2017 Business

Do try this at home

GROOT, a character from Disney’s film “Guardians of the Galaxy”, is usually mass-produced by the entertainment company as a small, collectable figurine and sold by retailers such as Toys “R” Us. But just before the release of the second film in the franchise earlier this year, Byambasuren Erdenejargal, a Mongolian enthusiast, noticed that people in a 3D-printing group on Facebook were searching for a computer model of Groot. So Mr Erdenejargal decided to create one. He spent four days perfecting the design and its printability before uploading his creation to Thingiverse, an online 3D-printing community based in New York. His digital model of the arboreal creature has since been downloaded (and probably printed in physical form) over 75,000 times.

Fans of popular TV programmes and films have long used arts and crafts to express their attachment to fictional characters. Etsy, an online marketplace for artisanal products, is full of…Continue reading

Reform of China’s ailing state-owned firms is emboldening them

July 20th, 2017 Business

ACCORDING to company lore, Yunnan Baiyao, a musty-smelling medical powder, played a vital role during the Long March. As China’s Communist troops fled from attacks in the 1930s, trekking thousands of miles to a new base, they spread its yellow granules on their wounds to stanch bleeding. To this day, instructions on the Yunnan Baiyao bottle recommend application after being shot or stabbed. Many Chinese households keep some in stock to deal with more run-of-the-mill cuts. But the government has recently put its maker into service to treat a different kind of ailment: the financial weakness of state-owned enterprises (SOEs).

Yunnan Baiyao has emerged as a poster-child of China’s new round of SOE reform. The company, previously owned by the south-western province of Yunnan, sold a 50% stake to a private investor earlier this year. The same firm had tried to buy a slice of Yunnan Baiyao in 2009 but was blocked. Its success this time has been held up in the official press as proof that a…Continue reading