A columnist makes asinine arguments on climate change, prompting scientists to cut their noses, spiting our faces

April 30th, 2017 Science

The cure for false speech is more truth telling — not less speech. In his first piece as an op ed columnist for the N.Y. Times, Bret Stephens rightly decries hyperbole in discussion about climate change. Then he makes seemingly reasonable arguments that turn out to be asinine. My reaction? Yawn. It’s quite doubtful that he will move the needle of public opinion on climate policy in the United States beyond the noise of natural variability. And I’m pretty darn sure that what he says in hi

A Cosmic-Ray Hunter Closes in on Super-Energetic Particles

April 30th, 2017 Science
A Cosmic-Ray Hunter Closes in on Super-Energetic Particles

Angela Olinto’s new balloon experiment takes her one step closer to the unknown source of the most energetic particles in the universe. The post A Cosmic-Ray Hunter Closes in on Super-Energetic Particles appeared first on WIRED.

What if You Could Grow a Baby in a Bottle?

April 30th, 2017 Science
What if You Could Grow a Baby in a Bottle?

An artificial womb to help premies makes you wonder where the technology could go next. The post What if You Could Grow a Baby in a Bottle? appeared first on WIRED.

Non-O blood groups associated with higher risk of heart attack

April 30th, 2017 Science

Having a non-O blood group is associated with a higher risk of heart attack, according to research presented today at Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.

Intervention reduced suicide attempts among at-risk emergency department patients

April 30th, 2017 Science

Among suicidal patients, an intervention that included brief post-discharge phone calls significantly reduced the likelihood of a future suicide attempt, according to a clinical trial conducted at eight hospitals.

Ivabradine may not benefit certain heart failure patients

April 30th, 2017 Science

Researchers have completed a randomized clinical trial in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which currently has no effective treatment for reducing morbidity and mortality.

Unemployment associated with 50 percent higher risk of death in heart failure patients

April 30th, 2017 Science

Unemployment is associated with a 50 percent higher risk of death in patients with heart failure, according to research presented today at Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.1 The observational study in more than 20,000 heart failure patients found that not being employed was linked with a greater likelihood of death than history of diabetes or stroke.

State of social, personality psychology research

April 30th, 2017 Science

Two studies have examined the state and quality of social and personality research and how practices have changed, if at all.

Any Ban on Killer Robots Faces a Tough Sell

April 30th, 2017 Science

Fears of a Terminator-style arms race have already prompted leading AI researchers and Silicon Valley leaders to call for a ban on killer robots. The United Nations plans to convene its first formal meeting of experts on lethal autonomous weapons later this summer. But a simulation based on the hypothetical first battlefield use of autonomous weapons showed the challenges of convincing major governments and their defense industries to sign any ban on killer robots. In October 2016, the Ch

New Human Rights for the Age of Neuroscience?

April 30th, 2017 Science

Do we have a human right to the privacy of our brain activity? Is “cognitive liberty” the foundation of all freedom? An interesting new paper by Swiss researchers Marcello Ienca and Roberto Andorno explores such questions: Towards new human rights in the age of neuroscience and neurotechnology Ienca and Andorno begin by noting that it has long been held that the mind is “a kind of last refuge of personal freedom and self-determination”. In other words, no matter what restrictions might

American Geriatrics Society voices opposition to amended American Health Care Act

April 29th, 2017 Science

Following a review of the recently released MacArthur Amendment to the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) remains opposed to this legislation that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and which AGS experts believe would harm access to key health services for older adults, caregivers, and healthcare professionals.

Expert unravels disease that took the hearing of world-famous painter

April 29th, 2017 Science

Francisco Goya is the most important Spanish artist of the late 18th and early 19th century. In 1793, Goya, then 46, came down with a severe, undiagnosed illness. His hearing never returned. Now, a hearing expert has developed a diagnosis. She thinks Goya likely suffered from an autoimmune disease.

A new interpretation of petrogenesis of the early continental crust rock (trondhjemite) in the earth

April 29th, 2017 Science

Petrogenesis of ancient granitoids is the key to understand the formation and evolution of the early continental crust in the earth. One recent research presents a new view of genesis of Archean trondhjemite in the Eastern Hebei, published in Science China Earth Sciences.

New organic lasers one step closer to reality

April 29th, 2017 Science

Researchers at Kyushu University’s Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research have developed an optically pumped organic thin-film laser that can continuously emit light for 30 ms, which is more than 100 times longer than previous devices.

Discovery of a facile process for H2 production using ammonia as a carrier

April 29th, 2017 Science

Researchers at Oita University, Japan, have created a new process for producing H2 from ammonia with rapid initiation that requires no external heat source, giving hope for the increased global use of H2 as an efficient and clean energy source.

The high cost of surviving acute respiratory distress syndrome

April 29th, 2017 Science

Nearly half of previously employed adult survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome were jobless one year after hospital discharge, and are estimated to have lost an average of $27,000 in earnings, new research concludes.

Symptoms of cystitis probably caused by bacterial infection, even when tests are negative

April 29th, 2017 Science

The majority of women suffering with pain when urinating, or needing to urinate often or urgently probably do have a bacterial infection, even when nothing is detected by standard urine testing.

England’s cancer drugs fund ‘failed to deliver meaningful value to patients and society’

April 29th, 2017 Science

Analysis of the drugs that were approved for use by the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) in England has shown that the fund was not good value for patients and society and may have resulted in patients suffering unnecessarily from toxic side effects of the drugs.

The ocean detectives

April 29th, 2017 Science

Three new groups of viruses that attack microorganisms from the archaeal marine group, Euryarchaeota have been discovered by scientists. In all, 26 viruses previously unknown to science were found.

Modern metabolic science yields better way to calculate indoor carbon dioxide

April 29th, 2017 Science

The air we breathe out can help us improve the quality of the air we breathe in. But to do so, one needs a reliable way to calculate the concentration of carbon dioxide we produce indoors. Researchers have developed a new computation method that uses well-established concepts from the study of human metabolism and exercise physiology to significantly improve how this important data is derived.