SpaceX Successfully Launches Iridium Satellites Into Orbit Atop Falcon 9

June 26th, 2017 Gadgets, Science

After launching as scheduled at 8:25pm (1:55am IST), the Falcon 9’s first stage returned less than eight minutes after taking off.

Record UK rainfall in winter 2013-14 caused by tropics, stratosphere and climate warming

June 26th, 2017 Science

New research has revealed the causes of the UK’s record rainfall and subsequent flooding during the 2013-14 winter. Using carefully tailored atmosphere/ocean model experiments, the research team found that a combination of unusual tropical conditions, the stratospheric polar vortex, and climate warming were behind the extreme rainfall, which led to severe flooding across many parts of the UK.

Study debunks claim of greatly improved survival rate for gunshot victims

June 26th, 2017 Science

The survival rate of US gunshot victims has not shown a marked improvement, as other recent studies have suggested, according to new research. The purported increase in survival rate had been credited to improvements in emergency treatment and medical care of critically injured patients. But on close analysis, researchers found problems in the way data was collected and coded.

Using body noise to improve cancer detection

June 26th, 2017 Science

In passive elastography, the elasticity of tissue is measured using the body’s own propagation of shear waves, which enables more effective imaging deeper inside the body in an even more noninvasive way than traditional elastography and may be used for cancer detection. Stefan Catheline, researcher at the University at Lyon will discuss this and other elastography advances during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

Tiny bubbles offer sound solution for drug delivery

June 26th, 2017 Science

The blood-brain barrier protects the brain and central nervous system from harmful chemicals circulating in the blood but also prevents delivery of drugs that could help treat patients with brain cancers and diseases. With recent advances in technology, the blood-brain barrier can now be opened safely, noninvasively and in a targeted manner using ultrasound. One of the newest approaches aiming to advance this research will be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 26th, 2017 Science

People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate safely through the environment using echolocation. Bo Schenkman, from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, will present a summary of some aspects of his work on human echolocation during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

Seeing with your ears

June 26th, 2017 Science

Paris’ Cathedral of Notre Dame has a ghost orchestra that is always performing, thanks to a sophisticated, multidisciplinary acoustics research project that will be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston. In the project, computer models use recordings from a live concert held at the cathedral and detailed room acoustic simulations to produce a novel type of audience experience: a virtual recreation of the live performance using spatial audio and virtual reality.

Scratch test — wound healing disrupted by smoke but not by Vype e-cigarette vapor

June 26th, 2017 Science

A new laboratory study reveals that cigarette smoke completely prevented wound healing at concentrations over 20 percent in a wound healing assay, whereas e-cigarette vapor had no effect, even at 100 percent concentration and double the amount of nicotine relative to smoke. The ‘wound’ was created in a cultured layer of of vascular endothelial cells. These are the cells that line the inside of blood vessels.

The friendly honk

June 26th, 2017 Science

Sound permeates the human experience and gets our attention, sometimes traumatically so. Consider the car horn. It is a widespread practical application of this noise-trauma-alert principle — and an increasing source of noise pollution worldwide as the global traffic population grows. It also is the subject of new noise pollution research to be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston. The study introduces a new pedestrian-friendly car-horn sound identified through the Mean Option Score.

Authenticity key to landing a new job

June 24th, 2017 Science

At job interviews, relax and be yourself — if you’re good, being yourself may be the best way to secure a job offer, according to a new study involving UCL researchers.

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

June 24th, 2017 Science

EPFL researchers have found a way around what was considered a fundamental limitation of physics for over 100 years. They were able to conceive resonant systems that can store electromagnetic waves over a long period of time while maintaining a broad bandwidth. Their study, which has just been published in Science, opens up a number of doors, particularly in telecommunications.

Tiny nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting/treating disease new review of work on exosomes

June 24th, 2017 Science

Exosomes – tiny biological nanoparticles which transfer information between cells – offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease, the most comprehensive overview so far of research in the field has concluded. Areas which could benefit include cancer treatment and regenerative medicine.

Changes to diet, physical activity & behavior may reduce obesity in children, adolescents

June 24th, 2017 Science

Latest health evidence shows that making changes to diet, physical activity and behavior may reduce obesity in children and adolescents.

Researchers design sounds that can be recorded by microphones but inaudible to humans

June 24th, 2017 Science

Researchers at the University of Illinois have designed a sound that is completely inaudible to humans (40 kHz or above) yet is audible to any microphone. The sound combines multiple tones that, when interacting with the microphone’s mechanics, create what researchers call a ‘shadow,’ which is a sound that the microphones can detect.

Personalized exoskeletons are taking support one step farther

June 24th, 2017 Science

Researchers have developed an exoskeleton system that provides personalized support for its user. In healthy volunteers, the optimized exoskeleton reduced energy expenditure during walking by 24 percent, on average, compared to when the system was not providing personalized support.

Potential mechanism for HPV-induced skin cancer uncovered

June 24th, 2017 Science

Scientists have identified a molecular pathway by which some types of human papilloma virus (HPV) might increase the risk of skin cancer, particularly in people with the rare genetic disorder epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV).

Cancer cells may streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily

June 24th, 2017 Science

Cancer cells might streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily, new research suggests. The study, conducted in both human and mouse cells, shows that cancer genomes lose copies of repetitive sequences known as ribosomal DNA. While downsizing might enable these cells to replicate faster, it also seems to render them less able to withstand DNA damage.

Localized signaling islands in cells: New targets for precision drug design

June 24th, 2017 Science

New research overturns long-held views on a basic messaging system within living cells. Key cellular communication machinery is more regionally constrained within the cell than previously thought. The findings suggest new approaches to designing precision drugs. Localizing drug action at a specific ‘address’ within the cell could mean fewer side effects in treating cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other serious conditions.

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved

June 24th, 2017 Science

Researchers have found a way around what was considered a fundamental limitation of physics for over 100 years. They were able to conceive resonant systems that can store electromagnetic waves over a long period of time while maintaining a broad bandwidth. Their study opens up a number of doors, particularly in telecommunications.

How pheromones trigger female sexual behavior

June 24th, 2017 Science

A new study showed how a male pheromone in mice enhances sexual behaviors in females — and how it may enhance a different behavior, aggression, in males — by identifying distinct neural circuits and neurons that generate a particular behavioral response to specific chemical signals. The findings point to a model for further investigating how sex-specific innate behaviors in living things are controlled.