Shark Survives Over A Year With A Hole Between Its Stomach And The Sea

July 21st, 2017 Science

Sharks are pretty incredible animals. They’ve lived on this planet for more than 400 million years, and in that time, come to dominate the oceans they inhabit. That kind of survival when so many other lineages have gone extinct requires serious resilience. Now, a lemon shark off Florida has shown off just how tough these animals can be: he survived for at least 435 days with a hole in his body created as he shoved a swallowed fishing implement out of him through his flesh. The shark was f

What’s Going On With the World’s Most Destructive Mud Volcano?

July 21st, 2017 Science

The world’s most destructive mud volcano was born near the town of Sidoarjo, on the island of Java, Indonesia, just over 11 years ago – and to this day it has not stopped erupting. The mud volcano known as Lusi started on May 29, 2006, and at its peak disgorged a staggering 180,000 cubic meters of mud every day, burying villages in mud up to 40 meters thick. The worst event of its kind in recorded history, the eruption took 13 lives and destroyed the homes of 60,000 people. But although

California’s dangerous Detwiler fire: The amazing GOES-16 satellite sees the blaze itself, not just the billowing smoke

July 21st, 2017 Science

With its vastly improved capabilities, the new satellite has the potential to save the lives of firefighters For decades, satellites have been helping fire managers identify and monitor blazes, based on their smoke plumes and the hot spots they create in infrared imagery. But as the animation above shows in spectacular fashion, the new GOES-16 weather satellite has taken things to a new level. With higher resolution imagery, and nearly real-time imaging capabilities, it is already helpin

Total Solar Eclipse: Guess How Many People Can Actually Watch?

July 21st, 2017 Science

When a total solar eclipse passes over the US on August 21, nerds will flock to the areas where they can see a total blackout. How many of them can fit?

Meet the Woman Trying to Prepare Your Town for the Total Solar Eclipse

July 21st, 2017 Science

Kate Russo is the world’s go-to guide for communities planning for the massive influx of eclipse tourists this August 21.

Alzheimer’s drug may help treat traumatic brain injury

July 21st, 2017 Science

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of disability and death globally, but medications have generally failed to benefit patients.

How physical exercise prevents dementia

July 21st, 2017 Science

Numerous studies have shown that physical exercise seems beneficial in the prevention of cognitive impairment and dementia in old age. Now researchers at Goethe University Frankfurt have explored in one of the first studies worldwide how exercise affects brain metabolism.

The way of change is important!

July 21st, 2017 Science

However, a new research mind has to emerge in our minds from recent research article ‘The Relationship Between Green Building and Regional Economy: A Case Study in Guangdong, China,’ published in The Open Civil Engineering Journal.

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials

July 21st, 2017 Science

A team of physicists featuring researchers from MIPT and ITMO University has conducted a comparative analysis of a range of materials to determine if they are applicable to dielectric nanophotonics. Their systematic study produced results that can optimize the use of known materials for building optical nanodevices, as well as encourage the search for new materials with superior properties.

Flashes of light on the dark matter

July 21st, 2017 Science

A web that passes through infinite intergalactic spaces, a dense cosmic forest illuminated by very distant lights and a huge enigma to solve. These are the picturesque ingredients of a scientific research — carried out by an international team composed of researchers from SISSA and the ICTP in Trieste, the Institute of Astronomy of Cambridge and the University of Washington – that adds an important element for understanding one of the fundamental components of our Universe: the dark matter.

A new method of cooperative control of multiple unmanned surface vehicles

July 21st, 2017 Science

Unmanned surface vehicles (USVs), as a kind of miniature, multifunctional, intelligent and remotely controlled autonomous marine platform, is being an important embodiment of national marine science and technology. A new research paper published in SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences presents a design method for saturated coordinated control of multiple underactuated unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) on a closed curve, holding a symmetric formation pattern.

On the path to vitamin A in rice

July 21st, 2017 Science

Biochemists from the University of Freiburg have elucidated the structure of an enzyme that supplies carotenoid.

Pharmacology: Probing the pores in membrane vesicles

July 21st, 2017 Science

Ion channels in the membrane vesicles that mediate intracellular protein transport play a crucial role in cell physiology. A method developed by an Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team now allows them to be studied with greater specificity than ever before.

Neural nets model audience reactions to movies

July 21st, 2017 Science

Disney Research used deep learning methods to develop a new means of assessing complex audience reactions to movies via facial expressions and demonstrated that the new technique outperformed conventional methods.

Offer of $100 boosts rates of colon cancer screenings

July 21st, 2017 Science

Offering $100 to patients eligible for a preventive colonoscopy screening more than doubled the rate of screening when compared to a simple emailed request, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Rare discovery of 3 new toad species in Nevada’s Great Basin

July 21st, 2017 Science

Three new species of toads have been discovered living in Nevada’s Great Basin in an expansive survey of the 190,000 square mile ancient lake bottom. ‘We’ve found the toads in small, wet habitats surrounded by high-desert completely cut off from other populations,’ Dick Tracy, renowned biology professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, said. ‘These are absolutely new, true species that have been separated from other populations for 650,000 years.’

Computers using linguistic clues to deduce photo content

July 21st, 2017 Science

Scientists at Disney Research and the University of California, Davis have found that the way a person describes the content of a photo can provide important clues for computer vision programs to determine where various things appear in the image.

A genetic variation may increase tuberculosis susceptibility

July 21st, 2017 Science

-Researchers have shown that a single nucleotide change in a gene that affects production of hepcidin–a peptide involved in inflammation, immunity, and control of iron levels–is associated with greater susceptibility to extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

NASA sees Tropical Storm Fernanda sliding into central Pacific

July 21st, 2017 Science

Tropical Storm Fernanda has crossed the 140 degree longitude line and entered the central Pacific Ocean. NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement mission, or GPM, satellite took a look at the rainfall the weakening system was still generating as it moves toward Hawaii.

3-D scanning with water

July 21st, 2017 Science

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3-D objects. This new approach to 3-D shape acquisition is based on the well-known fluid displacement discovery by Archimedes and turns modeling surface reconstruction into a volumetric problem. Their method accurately reconstructs even hidden parts of an object that typical 3-D laser scanners are not able to capture.