Unravelling the mystery of DNA attacks in cells’ powerhouse could pave way for new cancer treatments

April 29th, 2017 Science

A five-year study has found the mechanism responsible for repairing damage to mitochondrial DNA. This discovery could pave the way for new treatments for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, say the researchers. This research may also have important implications for clinical advances in so called ‘three-parent baby’ mitochondrial donation.

Long-term fate of tropical forests may not be as dire as believed, says study

April 29th, 2017 Science

Conventional wisdom has held that tropical forest growth will dramatically slow with high levels of rainfall. But researchers turned that assumption on its head with an unprecedented review of data from 150 forests that concluded just the opposite.

Bonobos may be better representation of last common ancestor with humans

April 29th, 2017 Science

A new study examining the muscular system of bonobos provides firsthand evidence that the rare great ape species may be more closely linked, anatomically, to human ancestors than common chimpanzees.

Mapping the edge of reality

April 29th, 2017 Science

A genetic algorithm has been determined to confirm the rejection of classical notions of causality.

When bridges collapse: Researchers study whether we’re underestimating risk

April 29th, 2017 Science

Studying how and why bridges have collapsed in the past identifies the limitation of current risk assessment approach and demonstrates the value of new perspectives on climate change impact.

Are yearly body exams an answer to rising skin cancer rates?

April 29th, 2017 Science

As summer nears and more people prepare to go out in the sun, a dermatologist and dermatopathologist discusses the conflicting recommendations over full body skin inspections.

PowerPoint, LED projector enable new technique for self-folding origami

April 29th, 2017 Science

A new use for the ubiquitous PowerPoint slide has now been discovered: Producing self-folding three-dimensional origami structures from photocurable liquid polymers.

Researchers track impact of Brazil’s ‘Soy Moratorium’ on an advancing agricultural frontier

April 29th, 2017 Science

The 2006 Soy Moratorium had a larger effect in reducing deforestation in the Amazon than has been previously understood, outlines a new study.

Robotic Fruit Pickers May Help US Orchards With Worker Shortage

April 29th, 2017 Gadgets, Science

Harvest has been mechanised for large portions of the agriculture industry, but for commodities where the crop’s appearance is especially important, harvest is still done by hand.

Watch SpaceX Launch a Super-Secret Payload for the Feds

April 29th, 2017 Science
Watch SpaceX Launch a Super-Secret Payload for the Feds

*Cough cough* spy satellite *cough cough.* The post Watch SpaceX Launch a Super-Secret Payload for the Feds appeared first on WIRED.

Recluse Spiders Have the Only Self-Powered Silk Spinners

April 29th, 2017 Science

Even if you detest spiders—even if a photo of one makes you recoil from your screen—pause for a moment and consider the sheer machinery of these creatures. They coordinate the movement of eight legs and up to eight eyes at once. They are their own miniature textile factories, pumping out silk thread from an intricate set of appendages. And while most spiders use their legs to help spin the thread, or glue one end to a surface to pull it out, recluse spiders don’t need the help. They have the

Visit Prehistoric Scotland With A Couple Clicks

April 29th, 2017 Science

A recently released app featuring the latest research on prehistoric Scotland’s hillforts gets you close to the archaeological action with drone footage, 3D artifact renderings and plenty of other eye candy. Happy Friday, everyone…start your weekend right with a fascinating and slick bit of desktop time travel: the SERF Hillforts Project app, a digital treasure trove courtesy of the Strathearn Environs and Royal Forteviot Project and its partners. Launch the app and enjoy the views of s

The Electric Lilium Jet Hints at Future Air Taxis

April 29th, 2017 Science

The old science fiction fantasy of a flying car that both drives on the ground and flies in the air is unlikely to revolutionize daily commutes. Instead, Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs and aerospace companies dream of electric-powered aircraft that can take off vertically like helicopters but have the flight efficiency of airplanes. The German startup Lilium took a very public step forward in that direction by demonstrating the first electric-powered jet capable of vertical takeoff and la

Ocean acidification could impair the nitrogen-fixing ability of marine bacteria

April 29th, 2017 Science

While increased carbon dioxide levels theoretically boost the productivity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the world’s oceans, because of its ‘fertilizing’ effect, a new study reveals how increasingly acidic seawater featuring higher levels of this gas can overwhelm these benefits, hampering the essential service these bacteria provide for marine life.

Left-handed people are more likely to have a slender face

April 29th, 2017 Science

Individuals with a slender lower face are about 25 percent more likely to be left-handed. This unexpected finding was identified in 13,536 individuals who participated in three national surveys conducted in the United States. This association may shed new light on the origins of left-handedness, as slender jaws have also been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis, a disease that has shaped human evolution and which today affects 2 billion people.

Single gene encourages growth of intestinal stem cells, supporting ‘niche’ cells — and cancer

April 29th, 2017 Science

A gene previously identified as critical for tumor growth in many human cancers also maintains intestinal stem cells and encourages the growth of cells that support them, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. The finding, reported in the April 28 issue of Nature Communications, adds to evidence for the intimate link between stem cells and cancer, and advances prospects for regenerative medicine and cancer treatments.

Unraveling the mystery of DNA attacks in cells’ powerhouse could pave way for new cancer treatments

April 29th, 2017 Science

New research has unraveled the mystery of how mitochondria — the energy generators within cells — can withstand attacks on their DNA from rogue molecules.

Dawn of organic single crystal electronics

April 29th, 2017 Science

Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences (Japan) have developed a method for high performance doping of organic single crystal. Furthermore, they succeeded in the Hall effect measurement of the crystal — the world’s first case. The research has been published in the Advanced Materials.

Bacteria with Midas touch for efficient gold processing

April 29th, 2017 Science

Special ‘nugget-producing’ bacteria may hold the key to more efficient processing of gold ore, mine tailings and recycled electronics, as well as aid in exploration for new deposits, University of Adelaide research has shown.

Medical guidelines for astronauts to be launched in the US

April 29th, 2017 Science

Scientists at the University of Plymouth and Northumbria University, Newcastle, UK, are helping to write the medical rulebook that will keep astronauts fit and healthy during long trips through the solar system. Learning from the rulebook could also inform human health on Earth.