Self-folding origami: Chemical programming allows Nafion sheets to fold and refold

June 24th, 2017 Science

Plastic with a thousand faces: A single piece of Nafion foil makes it possible to produce a broad palette of complex 3-D structures. Researchers now describe how they use simple chemical ‘programming’ to induce the foil to fold itself using origami and kirigami principles. These folds can be repeatedly ‘erased’ and the foil can be ‘reprogrammed’.

Algorithm generates optimal origami folding patterns for any shape

June 24th, 2017 Science

A new algorithm generates practical paper-folding patterns to produce any 3-D structure.

Plastic Water Bottles Might Have Poisoned Ancient Californians

June 24th, 2017 Science, Technology

Native Americans living in California made their own plastic water bottles. However, they didn’t know how toxic that might be.

Study links sleep patterns with pain persistence after pediatric surgery

June 24th, 2017 Science

About 20 percent of children develop persistent pain after surgery, and a new study showed that poorer night-time sleep quality was significantly associated with greater next-day pain intensity over four months after surgery.

Ancient Egyptians to modern humans: Coronary artery disease genes benefit reproduction

June 24th, 2017 Science

Researchers have found that genes for coronary heart disease (CAD) also influence reproduction, so in order to reproduce successfully, the genes for heart disease will also be inherited.

Video games offer active military, veterans coping mechanism for stress

June 24th, 2017 Science

While most research on the topic focuses on gaming’s role in clinical settings, new research seeks to understand how everyday gameplay can provide military and veterans self-directed coping strategies to manage their physical and psychological stressors.

A rising star: Researchers dissect the process by which blood vessels shrink, which could have important implications for human health

June 24th, 2017 Science

It’s a tiny marine invertebrate, no more than 3 millimeters in size. But closely related to humans, Botryllus schlosseri might hold the key to new treatments for cancer and a host of vascular diseases.

Tiny nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting, treating disease new review of work on exosomes

June 24th, 2017 Science

Exosomes – tiny biological nanoparticles which transfer information between cells – offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease, the most comprehensive overview so far of research in the field has concluded. Areas which could benefit include cancer treatment and regenerative medicine.

Single electron’s tiny leap sets off ‘molecular sunscreen’ response

June 24th, 2017 Science

Scientists have seen the first step of a process that protects a DNA building block called thymine from sun damage: When it’s hit with ultraviolet light, a single electron jumps into a slightly higher orbit around the nucleus of a single oxygen atom.

How a single chemical bond balances cells between life and death

June 24th, 2017 Science

With SLAC’s X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping a crucial chemical bond from triggering a cell’s death spiral.

Heavy-drinking mothers linked to their child’s path toward the justice system

June 24th, 2017 Science

A new study investigated whether children whose mothers had an alcohol-related disorder would be at risk of early-life contact with the justice system, which can lead to many negative outcomes across an individual’s life span. Such outcomes can include repeated contact with the justice system, social disadvantages and marginalization, and mental-health and substance-use issues.

Plants sacrifice ‘daughters’ to survive chilly weather

June 24th, 2017 Science

Plants adopt different strategies to survive the changing temperatures of their natural environments. This is most evident in temperate regions where forest trees shed their leaves to conserve energy during the cold season. In a new study, a team of plant biologists found that some plants may selectively kill part of their roots to survive under cold weather conditions.

ACP expresses ‘strongest opposition’ to Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017

June 24th, 2017 Science

The American College of Physicians (ACP) expresses our strongest possible opposition to the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) of 2017, legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Turtle go-slow zone extensions needed

June 24th, 2017 Science

James Cook University marine scientists are calling for an extension of go-slow zones in turtle habitats to reduce boat strikes on the threatened creatures.

Public health guidelines aim to lower health risks of cannabis use

June 24th, 2017 Science

Canada’s Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines, released today with the endorsement of key medical and public health organizations, provide 10 science-based recommendations to enable cannabis users to reduce their health risks. The guidelines, based on a scientific review by an international team of experts, are published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Experts uncover first molecular events of organ rejection

June 24th, 2017 Science

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Toronto have uncovered the first molecular steps that lead to immune system activation and eventual rejection of a transplanted organ.

Discovery of a new mechanism involved in the migration of cancer cells

June 24th, 2017 Science

A team of young French researchers has discovered a new mechanism which facilitates cell migration. On the surface of its membrane, the cell develops multiple small hooks which help it to attach to fibers outside the cell and move along them. This action helps us to understand better how a cell escapes from the tumor mass and moves around the body to form a new focus.

Protein mingling under blue light

June 24th, 2017 Science

IBS scientists developed a new faster and more efficient optogenetic tool to manipulate protein clusters under blue light.

NUS study: Plants sacrifice ‘daughters’ to survive chilly weather

June 24th, 2017 Science

A new study by a team of plant biologists from the National University of Singapore found that some plants may selectively kill part of their roots to survive under cold weather conditions.

New research reveals impact of seismic surveys on zooplankton

June 24th, 2017 Science

Marine seismic surveys used in petroleum exploration could cause a two to three-fold increase in mortality of adult and larval zooplankton, new research published in leading science journal Nature Ecology and Evolution has found. Scientists from IMAS and the Centre for Marine Science and Technology (CMST) at Curtin University studied the impact of commercial seismic surveys on zooplankton populations by carrying out tests using seismic air guns in the ocean off Southern Tasmania.